Crossag or Monks’ Bridge

A narrow 13th century packhorse double-arched bridge paved with quartz cobbles spans the Silverburn immediately north of Rushen Abbey and adjacent to the mill race. Crossag is from ‘crosh veg’ meaning little cross. Apart from some repairs it is probably

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Lag-ny-Boirey

Lag-ny-Boirey (Manx for hollow of lamentation/botheration) is the site of a cluster of Bronze Age hut dwellings at Mull Hill.  During excavations in 1896 a Bronze Age clay model of a human face was unearthed. (source: Manks Antiquities (1914) by

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Manx Enigma from 1815

Can you guess the name of the village? “A place where ladies love to go, A vowel add – neither ‘i’ nor ‘o’, And what we do in summer eat – Omit a letter of this treat. If the rest

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Cuchulain of Muirthemne…

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FREE DOWNLOAD: Cuchulain of Muirthemne: the Story of the Men of the Red Branch of Ulster. I haven’t read this yet but it’s highly recommended by a friend who says (in response to a previous post on Lady Gregory’s book

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Manx Curse

“The stone of the church in the corner of thy house” (Clagh ny killagh ayns corneil dty hie). This is said to be the bitterest curse in the Manx language. The houses usually contained one room, a corner was partitioned

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The Things that Endure

Our land has fallen from her age of pride And put her old divinity aside; She is not now as in those storied days When a strange beauty lit familiar ways, When all the vivid life of hill and plain

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The Dooinney Molla – The Man Praiser

This expression is applied to a friendly match-maker, introduced by the young man, to relate to the parents of the girl of his heart – in glowing terms – what a desirable match his friend would make for their daughter.

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To a Manx Kitten

Thou little tailless cat with coat of jet, Whose amber eyes with ecstatic dew are wet, As on my lap thy paws beat even tread, “In-out, in-out” – as though thou’rt making bread! “Alice” we called thee from the day

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Easter Day – Laa Chaisht

Considered an unlucky day. T. Moore who helped Dr. Clague write his book ‘Reminiscenes’ told me that his grandfather would not allow his household to go from home on Easter Day for fear of accidents.   Daffodils were not to

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The Hermit of Struan y Granghie

On the coast of Lonan, about a mile and a half eastward of Laxey is Struan-y-Granghie, a little streamlet that comes tumbling over high cliffs of rock before it enters the sea. To the eastward of the stream the rock

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