Hospitality

On many of the quarterland farms on the Island, it was always the custom to provide hospitality, food and shelter for the wandering beggars who travelled about the roads; people who got their living by ‘going about the houses’ as

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Manx Fairytale – The Boyhood of Lugh

Long centuries ago, when Manannan Mac Lir was ruling in Mann, and when his court was famous over all the world for brave warriors and wise men, Lugh of the Long Arm was sent over from Erin to be brought

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Laa’l Breeshey – St Bridget’s Day

It was customary to keep this festival on the eve of the first of February, in honour of the Irish lady who came over to the Isle of Man to receive the veil from St. Maughold. The custom was to

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Saint Bridget’s Night

A way back in the times long past there was a woman called Nan Quine living with her husband Tom, and their one child Paie, in a bit of a croft on the track that goes up from the shore

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Caillagh ny Gueshagh / Caillagh ny Groamagh

Every ditch had to be full of rain or snow on St Bridget’s Day so that the old Caillagh, or hag, could not gather brasnags or faggots (sticks) for firing. If she could lay in a stock of firing on

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Invocation to Saint Bridget

As Laa’l Breeshey (St Bridget’s Day) approaches on 1st February, here is a Manx Folksong ‘Invocation to St Bridget’. The first link provides the sheet music and words. The second and third links are two sound files where you can

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In Corna Dale

Seven hundred years ago and three added on to that, and on a midsummer day, Corna Dale lay bathed in the morning sun. The thunder storm of the previous night had left the air fresh and cool and in the

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Lord of the Stormy Headlands

“O Manannan, Lord of the stormy headlands, Cast thy mantle over us now!” The above lines were perhaps a charm, or part of a charm, for invisibility or protection by means of the magic mist with which he enwreathed the

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The House on the Hill

Ay! the farmhouse is shuttered an’ empty, An’ the wans that lived theer is all gone; No smook from the chimley goes curlin’, For the days o’ that li’l crof’ is done.   No dog barks a half-warnin’ welcome; No

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Fairies & Mortals

The airs of two or three Manx songs have the name of being ‘fairy tunes’ which were overheard in lonely places, especially on the banks of streams. Other melodies from the Middle World are ‘Tappaghyn Jiargey’ (The Red Topknots) and

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