Manx Life

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The Significance of Fire

To keep the home fires burning… In the Isle of Man the element takes on a two-sided significance. By fire the Island was discovered for men’s use and misuse, and by fire it has ever since been prevented from reverting

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The Skeab Lome

The curse and ritual of the Skeab Lome (Besom of Destruction) does not appear to have an exact parallel in any other nation’s folklore, though the association of the broom plant with witchcraft has been widespread. In some parts of

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The Oural Losht

The purifying virtue of fire was often used to destroy the malignant power present in a dead or dying animal, and so prevent further misfortune, and to discover the person whose Evil Eye or charm-making was responsible for the loss.

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A Manx Wedding

A Manx wedding is one of the traditional social occasions of which the memory has not been allowed to die on the Island. Life is not now always recognisably Manx, far from it, but from time to time there is

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5th Century Mann

We know that at the time of the Roman invasion the whole of the British Isles was occupied by three distinct races; first, that pre-Aryan race, usually called Iberian, whose presence in our Island for a period of unknown length

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Peculiar Laws & Customs

Bishop Wilson tells us in his ‘History of the Isle of Man’ that “there are a great many laws and Customs which are peculiar to this place and singular” in his time (1697-1755): – The eldest daughter (if there be

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The Bishop’s Bridle

Among the accustomed unwritten laws of the Manx Church was the following:   “That he or she that call a man a ‘Dog’ or a woman a ‘Bitch’ shall wear the Bridle at the Market Cross or make 7 Sundays

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Fairy Words & Their Meanings

FAIRIES – “The fairies are baking,” is said of a sunshine-shower. The old people used to say: “Ta ny ferrishyn fuinney tra ta’n ghrian soilshean as y fliaghey tuittym“, i.e. The fairies are baking when the sun is shining and

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Black Foreigners & Fair Strangers

In Viking times, the Danes were called ‘DHOO-GAEL’, that is black foreigners, while the Norwegians were called ‘FIN-GAEL,’ fair strangers. It has usually been supposed that this was a distinction made on account of a difference in complexion and colour

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Myles Standish and the Isle of Man

There is a little farm named Ellanbane, once the White Island set in a lake in Lezayre. In Elizabeth I’s last years it was the home of Huan Standish, whose ancestor, John, is recorded as having bought land in Lancashire

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