Manx Life

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Mud Cottage, Cranstal

An attempt has been made to encompass all aspects of life in the Island but one may be led to think that the old body of tradition is more truly found in the cottages and small farms of the countryside.

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Mrs Gilrea of the East Nappin

This photograph is of Mrs Mary Gilrea spinning outside her sod house on the East Nappin in Jurby on the Isle of Man in 1897. In the northern parishes where building stone was scarce, crofts and other small houses were

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Sophy’s Cottage, Dalby

Written on the back of this photograph it reads: “Sophy was a real character, I knew her well but can’t remember her surname. She looked after the chapel in Dalby and cleaned it. Her cottage was just beyond the chapel

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Hospitality

On many of the quarterland farms on the Island, it was always the custom to provide hospitality, food and shelter for the wandering beggars who travelled about the roads; people who got their living by ‘going about the houses’ as

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Saint Bridget’s Night

A way back in the times long past there was a woman called Nan Quine living with her husband Tom, and their one child Paie, in a bit of a croft on the track that goes up from the shore

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Changes in Sovereignty

The death of Magnus Olafsson in 1265 terminated for a long period the democratic freedom of the Manx people, a freedom which they had enjoyed for over three hundred years. Their Norse ancestors had raised the Isle of Man as

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Peel – Some Folk Tales

The various names under which Peel has passed are inseparable from the history of its castled and cathedralled islet, and their consideration must yield first place to matters of greater moment. An old Ballaugh woman knows a good deal about

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White Stones & Burials

White stones, ranging from the size of boys’ marbles up to that of small boulders, are plentiful in or on burial-places both ancient and recent. Almost every Manx tumulus excavated yields a quantity. In the remains of the keeills or

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The Drine Skeg (Hawthorn Hedge)

I would like to speak about the drine skeg or hawthorn hedge, which, although not recognised by law as a boundary hedge, is largely used to separate fields, especially in the lowlands. The planting of these is of special interest.

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Manx Farming – Cultivation

Manx farmers had little understanding of crop rotation and scarcely practiced it, according to Basil Quayle, who described their farming in 1794. In the days before sown grasses or turnips were introduced to the Island, the only green crops to

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