Manx Life

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The Water Bayliff

The Water Bayliff was not only an important figure in the Island’s maritime activities, but his office reaches very far back in our nation’s history. One of the Customary Laws of 1422 reads: “Alsoe be it ordained that the Water

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When Bees Swarm

“It’s a sign of death, mmm…yes it is. For there was three swarms came them three years, one after another, into the chimley of the house, an’ I lost three, one after the other; a big lump of a boy

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The Teares of Ballawhane

Memories of Charles Teare’s wonderful powers seem inexhaustible and there is no question of the natural skill in medicines both human and animal, enjoyed by the Teare family for several generations. Charles’ descendants carried on the tradition after his death.

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Manx Words – The Family

A few Manx words relating to family… MUMMIG – pron. mummig – mummy/mammy MOIR – pron. mawr – mother JISHAG – pron. jizhig – daddy/father AYR – pron. air – father BRAAR – pron. braar – brother SHUYR – pron.

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The Chiollagh

The chiollagh, or open hearth, is a feature of the old Manx farm and cottage kitchen which is rapidly passing into obscurity.  Indeed, not more than half a dozen or so remain in use in the whole Island.  The introduction

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Charlie the Cox

Four years ago, in a terrific gale, a ship from Norway, the St. George, came dead on the wildest part of our coast, the fierce headland that lies back of Peel Castle rock. The sound signal was fired and Charlie

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Laa’l Breeshey – St Bridget’s Feast Day

It was customary to keep this festival on the eve of the first of February, in honour of the Irish lady who came over to the Isle of Man to receive the veil from St. Maughold. The custom was to

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Wind Frolics (Gammanyn Geayee)

It was St. Patrick’s Day and happened to be a Friday so was pension day. My sister and I prepared to set off for the post offices where we collected our pensions. We went to different post offices. I used

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The Colours came from the Manx Countryside

At last year’s Ellynyn ny Gael Exhibition of Traditional Arts (circa 1964) there stood upon one of the tables what looked like a large bowl of many coloured flowers. In point of fact the bowl contained not the actual blooms,

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Harvest Customs

The following description of the procedure at an old-time harvest-home is gathered from a pamphlet by George Quarrie entitled ‘The Melliah’. It is a rhymed account of the final harvesting of thirty stacks of oats, barley and wheat in Kirk

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