Deodand

Deodand

The ancient legal penalty of Deodand, well known in England, by which an animal or object causing a death was confiscated and became the king’s property, was enforced in the Isle of Man so late as the end of the 17th century, and probably later still.

In 1694 a bull which killed John Cain, of Lhergy Dhoo, in the parish of German, was forfeited as Deodand to the Lord of the Isle.


(source: artwork Hereford Bull by Hans Droog; text A Second Manx Scrapbook by WW Gill (1932))

Bernadette Weyde

Bernadette Weyde

I'm a web designer, amateur historian and keen gardener and I enjoy bringing Manx history, folklore and poetry to a modern audience.


Tags assigned to this article:
animalscustoms

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