Fairy Christening

Fairy Christening

The man that was telling this story said he knew the house and the young men as well, and that the house was haunted by the fairies.

There was one night and there was no water in the house, and one of the servant girls refused to go and get water, as the hour was late, and there was an old beggar-woman lodging in the house that night, so she kept awake, and the rest of the family were asleep. And the fairies had a christening, but had no water to baptize the baby, and they made much noise; they came at last to the bed and took the foot of the girl that refused to get water and bled it under the nail of the big toe, and put the cup with the blood in under a flag near the hearth; so the girl began to pine away, and when this old woman came again on her rounds the girl was very poorly, and she told them about the cup, and they lifted the flag, and took it out, and the young woman got well again, and if she is not dead, she is alive yet!


(source: Yn Lioar Manninagh c.1899, A Manx Notebook; artwork Michael Peter Ancher, The Sick Girl)

Bernadette Weyde

Bernadette Weyde

I'm a web designer, amateur historian and keen gardener and I enjoy bringing Manx history, folklore and poetry to a modern audience.


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