Mountains and Hills

Mountains and Hills

The Isle of Man contains 12 peaks which stand at over 1,500 ft. All of these except for South Barrule (which is found in the south) are found in the central range which spans the region between the central valley and the flat fertile northern plain. Despite the fact that none of these peaks are relatively high, they appear quite prominent and impressive due to their proximity to the sea.

Whilst many of these peaks are rugged in nature they are not steep enough to provide many opportunities for technical climbing (which can be found in abundance around the coast). There are opportunities for scrambling in some areas including the northern slopes of north Barrule, around the Sloc, the southern slopes of Greba mountain. These provide a fantastic training ground for the higher steeper mountains in places such as Snowdonia or the Highlands of Scotland, they are also far less crowded than some of Britain’s more popular hill destinations yet just as impressive in character. All of these peaks can be attained by a rough hill walk.

• Snaefell – 2,034 ft (620 m)
• North Barrule – 1,842 ft (561 m)
• Clagh Ouyr – 1,808 ft (551 m)
• Beinn-y-Phott – 1,772 ft (540 m)
• Slieau Freoaghane – 1,602 ft (488 m)
• Colden – 1,599 ft (487 m)
• South Barrule – 1,585 ft (483 m)
• Slieau Ruy – 1,570 ft (478 m)
• Sartfell – 1,560 ft (475 m)
• Slieau Chiarn – 1,533 ft (467 m)
• Carraghyn – 1,520 ft (463 m)
• Slieu Lhean – 1,507 ft (459 m)


(source: wiki; photo North Barrule)

Bernadette Weyde

Bernadette Weyde

I'm a web designer, amateur historian and keen gardener and I enjoy bringing Manx history, folklore and poetry to a modern audience.


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