Peel Street Names 1874

Peel Street Names 1874

Taken from Peel City Guardian 7 Jan 1922:

The quaint and interesting information following was contained in a printed poster issued by the head of the town – the late High Bailiff Moore – at a time when many of Peel’s streets were apparently causing confusion.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Respecting the names of the several streets, roads, lanes, etc, in the town of Peel. Whereas several of the streets in the town of Peel have no fixed or distinct name, whilst others bear a variety of names, in consequence whereof considerable inconvenience has arisen, and much confusion exists not only to the highway and other rate collectors, but also to the general public.

And whereas the Highway Committee having consented to supply name plates for the principal streets, it becomes necessary that the names of the several streets within the boundaries of the town should be definitely settled. I do therefore hereby give notice and direct that in future the several streets, roads, lanes, courts, and places within the boundaries of the said town of Peel (and which boundaries were defined and declared by order under the hands of the High-Bailiff of the town and the Committee of Highways, dated the 18th day of February, 1873) shall be set forth in the Schedule at foot hereof.

Given this 28th day of May, 1874,
ROBT. J. MOORE,
High-Bailiff of Peel.

SCHEDULE

Containing the names, situations, etc, of the several streets, roads, terraces, lanes, courts and places within the boundaries of the town of Peel, 28th May, 1874.

► The open space in front of St. Peter’s Church and extending eastwards to the Peel Castle Hotel and embracing the area southwards to a line with the steps of the late Mr Grave’s sailroom originally called “The Cross”, afterwards Market Cross, and latterly the “MARKET PLACE”, to bear the last mentioned name.

► The street leading northwards from the Market Place towards the Quay and terminating at the west gable of the Marine Hotel, formerly known as “Big Street”, to be called by its modern name of “CASTLE STREET”.

► The lane leading out of the last named street at Mr Wm Keig’s shop and running along the north wall of the churchyard and opening at the Quay at the old “Vaults’ Yard”, (now used as a shipbuilding yard by Mr Graves) and known as “Church Lane”, the “Vaults’ Lane”, “Summer’s Lane”, and for several years past as “St. PETER’S LANE”, to be called by the latter name.

► The lane leading from Castle Street between the old Grammar School premises and the Court House to the Quay, for a length of time known as “The Parson’s Lane”, to be called “COURTHOUSE LANE”.

► The street leading from the Quay along the property of the Harbour Commissioners and past the Police Station to the house formerly belonging to and occupied by the late Mrs Hutchinson, and known as “Munn’s Corner”, at one time called “Quay Street”, to retain the present name of “CROWN STREET”.

► The road or street extending from “Munn’s Corner”, along the margin of the beach, as far as the house standing by itself and facing the west (formerly known as “White’s House”, and latterly as “George Skelly’s House”) called by the respective names of “The Shore Road”, and the “Marine Road”, to bear the name of “SHORE ROAD”.

► The lane or opening from the south side of the “Shore Road”, between the house formerly known as “Phil Quilliam’s House” now belonging to Mr Henry Kaye) and the property known as “The Barracks” (recently purchased by Mr John Teare) therefore called “Boyde’s Lane”, and the “BARRACK LANE” to bear the latter title.

► The lane or opening from the south side of the “Shore Road” into the old “Wesleyan Methodist Chapel” and to the rear of that building to be called “OLD CHAPEL COURT”.

► The extension of the Shore Road from White’s House toward “Creg Malin” to be distinguished by its old name of “THE GREEN”.

► The lane running in the rear of The Green and opening at the Kirk German Vicarage house, formerly called The Jib, but sometimes designated Back Green Lane, to be called by its ancient name of the “JIB LANE”.

► The lane leading from the last mentioned one to The Green houses, and opening at the east gable of “Cowx’s House” (now occupied by Mrs Susanah Cowell), to be called the “GREEN LANE”.

► The road or street some years ago formed from the east end of the Shore Road southward to the Kirk Michael road, and opening opposite to “Yeaman’s Well”, known as the New Road and “STANLEY ROAD”, to bear the latter name.

► The street leading northwards from the Market Place towards the Mathematical School, to be called “LOWER MARKET STREET”.

► The lane leading from the last named street to “Castle Street”, anciently called the Bayr Broagh, afterwards “Love Lane”, “Cottier’s Lane”, and sometimes “McCormick’s Lane”, to be called “LOVE LANE”.

► The street leading from “Lower Market Street”, in front of the Mathematical School to Mr Charles Morrison’s shop, called on the recent published Ordnance Map “College Street”, to be the name of “HOPE STREET”.

► The street branching off from the last named one to the “Shore Road”, opposite the public drinking fountain, to be called “FOUNTAIN STREET”.

► The back street leading from Mr Charles Morrison’s dwelling house (formerly known as Joe Cowell’s Corner) towards his new warehouse and heretofore called “Walker’s Lane”, the “Boy-Bowyer’s Lane”, “Pilot Street”, and , “CHARLES STREET”, to bear the last mentioned name.

► The street running southwards from the “Shore Road” at Black’s Corner (subsequently known as the “Coastguard Station House”) the property of Messrs. Karran, to the junction of the streets opposite to Mr. Morrison’s warehouse, to retain its present name of “QUEEN STREET”.

► The street branching from the last named point northward, and opening to the “Shore Road” at “The Gable”, to be called “BEACH STREET”.

► The street leading eastward from “The Gable” towards the lower end of “Bridge Street” and heretofore known as “Duck Street”, to take the name of “DUKE STREET”.

► The street from thence (sic), eastward to Mr. Corrin’s net warehouse, to retain its old name of “STRAND STREET”.

► The street leading southward from the “Market Place” to the “Cross Veg”, to be called “UPPER MARKET STREET”.

► The street running in a direct line from thence (sic), commencing from Mr Carran the Druggist’s shop, and formerly known as “Arthur’s Corner” to retain its old name of “DOUGLAS STREET”, up to the north corner of the late Mr. John White’s property.

► The lane or passage leading out of the west side of “Douglas Street” by “Johnny Gawne’s House” (now the property of Messrs. Karran) and the space in the rear of that house to be called “GAWNE’S COURT”.

► The road or passage leading out of the west side of “Douglas Street” by the gable of “Ned Hook’s house”, formerly called “Jeebin Street”, to retain its more modern name of “THE SOUND”.

► The continuation of “Douglas Street” past the late “Billy White’s house” and on to the boundary of the town in that direction (beyond the residence of Mr. Thomas Carran) heretofore known as the “Douglas Road”, to take the name of “TYNWALD ROAD”.

► The road opening out of the west side of the last named one and leading to the “Logan’s Rheast”, “Close Thault” [Toalt], and “The Scotch Quarter”, to retain its old name of “BAYR CROSS”.

► The narrow road or lane running from the north corner of the last named road by “The Scotch Quarter”, and opening in “Douglas Street”, in the rear of the late Mr John White’s house, to be called “SCOTCH QUARTER LANE”.

► The street leading from “Douglas Street”, at “Corris’s Corner”, past the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, as far as the premises of the Bank of Mona, originally known as “The Close”, and “Joyner’s Close”, to retain its present name of “ATHOLL STREET”.

► The road leading eastward from the corner of the Bank of Mona, formerly called Molloy’s Road, Paddy Lace’s Road, Poortown Road, and Rockmount Road, to bear the name of “DERBY ROAD”, and to extend to the boundary of the town in that direction beyond “Kaighen Begs”.

► The street running from the junction of Upper Market Street and Douglas Street, opposite the Cross Veg and heretofore called Kirk Michael Street, to be called “MICHAEL STREET”, up to a line running from the west corner of the house formerly known as “Phil. Ballachrink’s” (now the property of Mrs. Shimmin) and the west corner of “Garrett the Dyer’s house”.

► The street or open space beyond that line and extending to the houses lately erected by Mr. William Keig, and now occupied by Messrs. Shimmin and Co., drapers, to retain its recently acquired name of “ATHOLL PLACE”.

► The street extending from Atholl Place past Christian’s Endowed National School, to the west gable of the house formerly known as “Garrett the tailor’s house”, now the property of Mr. William Dodd, and heretofore designated Upper Michael Street and Kirk Michael Road, to take the name of “CHRISTIAN STREET”.

► The street or road beyond the point last named and extending to the entrance of Stanley Road, opposite to “Yeaman’s Well”, to bear the name lately applied to it of “STANLEY TERRACE”.

► The road from the end of Stanley Road, past the Vicarage, and as far as the boundary of the town extended at the Ballaquane Avenue to be called “PEVERIL ROAD”.

► The Terrace of houses belonging to the “Peel Town Building Co.”, standing to the north of the last named road, to retain the name of “PEVERIL TERRACE”.

► The street leading northward from the junction of Athol (sic) Place and Christian Street, to the Shore Road at one time called The Gill, and afterwards “BRIDGE STREET”, to bear the latter name.

► The road leading from the west end of Atholl Place, past Mr. Thomas Clarke’s houses and extending to Mr. Corrin’s Net Warehouse, in Strand Street, sometimes called Michael Lane, Craine’s Lane, Back Michael Street, marked on the Ordnance map as Chapel Lane, but latterly known as “FACTORY LANE”, to bear the last mentioned name.

► The lane running from the north side of Michael Street past the Primitive Methodist Chapel, and opening into Factory Lane, formerly called “Cowin’s Lane”, to take the name of “CHAPEL LANE”.

► The opening or passage from the south side of Michael Street opposite to the said chapel, to retain its old name of “DODD’S LANE”.

► The lane leading northward out of Michael Street, at the corner of Mr. Thos. Kermode, the Ironmonger’s shop, and extending to Mr. Charles Morrison’s Warehouse, in Charles Street, called at various times “Taubman’s Lane”, “Carran’s Lane”, and “Custom-house Lane”, to take the name of “ORRY LANE”.

► The street leading southward from the Market Place, past the Peel Castle Hotel Stables, to the house formerly known as “McHutchin’s house”, subsequently belonging to Capt. James T. Clucas, and now occupied by Mrs. Kermeen, heretofore called “Kirk Patrick Street”, to bear the name of “PATRICK STREET”.

► The street or road extending from the last-described house to the north corner of the garden attached to the house belonging to Mr. Henry Maddrell Graves, and heretofore called Upper Kirk Patrick Street, and Kirk Patrick Road, to bear the name of “UPPER PATRICK STREET”.

► The extension of the said road or street to the boundary of the town, south of the “Old ropewalk house” and marked on the Ordnance map as Edge Hill, to be called “GLENFABA ROAD”.

► The street formed by “The Peel Waterworks Company”, in the field lying to the east of the last-mentioned road and in which they have a reservoir, which field is frequently called the Tank Field, to bear the name originally given to it by the Company, viz. “ST. GERMAN’S PLACE.”

► The street leading from Patrick Street, by the “Garey Brown” [Brown’s Garden], to the “Big Well” or “Chibbyr Pherick”, formerly known as the Well Brow, and latterly as the Mill Road, to be called “STATION ROAD”, and to extend to the north end of the premises belonging to the Peel Gas Light Co.

► The continuation of the said road past the Gas Works and on to Cooper’s Corn Mill, in former times called Ellison’s Road, and Close Chiarn Road, to bear its modern name of the “MILL ROAD”.

► The road or passage leading westward from the Mill Road, opposite to Mrs King’s garden (formerly “Ellison’s garden”) in the rear of the old “Red Herring House” (now the property of the Isle of Man Railway Co. Ltd.), to the wooden bridge across the upper end of the harbour and the river Neb to Peel Hill, to take the name of the “NEB ROAD”.

► The street or open space between Mr Graves’ Warehouse and the Railway Station, on “The Lake”, and extending westward to the south corner of the late Mr Thomas Wattleworth’s property, formerly called the “Factory”, to be called “StATION PLACE”.

► The lane from “Station Place” leading up to “Patrick Street”, formerly known as “Tom Dawson’s Lane”, then as “Siddleton’s Lane”, and latterly as “LAKE LANE”, to retain the last-mentioned name.

► The street or lane leading from the top of “Lake Lane”, and running immediately in the rear of the Churchyard and opening into “St. Peter’s Lane”, at one time called “Porter’s Lane”, to take the name of “CHURCH LANE”.

► The lane leading out of the lower part of “St. Peter’s Lane”, and between the house formerly known as “Qualtrough Ballashallough’s house”, and the late Mr. Robert Higgin’s warehouse, running in front of the late “Bobby Keown’s houses”, and continuing between Mr Farrant’s property and the gardens in the rear of the houses belonging to the late Bobby Corris and others, and opening to the Quay at the south wall of the old Grammar School yard, to retain its old name of “KEOWN’S LANE”.

► The road now being formed by the Harbour Commissioners to the north of their property adjoining the Beach, and which will now open a communication between the Shore Road at Munn’s Corner and the Quay, to be called “VICTORIA ROAD”.


(source: A Manx Notebook; photograph by Peter Killey at Manxscenes Photography)

Bernadette Weyde

Bernadette Weyde

I'm a web designer, amateur historian and keen gardener and I enjoy bringing Manx history, folklore and poetry to a modern audience.


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