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The Language of Birds in Old Norse Tradition

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FREE DOWNLOAD: From the University of Iceland, a great resource. 95 pages. Available in PDF format. http://bit.ly/13KZaZq

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The Hare

The animal most intimately allied with magic in the Isle of Man is the hare, whose shape is often assumed by Witches than any other. A local lady wrote to the Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould in the latter part of the

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The People of Colby…

Tradition states that before there were any attorneys, the people of Colby used to adjust their differences over the dead body of a wren; each party would pluck some of the feathers and bury them, and the case was settled.

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The Cormorant and The Bat

There was a time in the olden days when the cormorant and the bat took counsel together to do something for the poor as they had compassion on them, and they went into the glens gathering wool to make clothing

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Manx Superstition

When the robin will not sing in churchyard trees, the place is said to be haunted. (source: photo; text from an article in the Hartford Times, 1892)

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Deodand

The ancient legal penalty of Deodand, well known in England, by which an animal or object causing a death was confiscated and became the king’s property, was enforced in the Isle of Man so late as the end of the

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To a Manx Kitten

Thou little tailless cat with coat of jet, Whose amber eyes with ecstatic dew are wet, As on my lap thy paws beat even tread, “In-out, in-out” – as though thou’rt making bread! “Alice” we called thee from the day

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The First Bee

The old fishermen thought it very lucky to catch the first bee they happened to see in April. It was the sign of a good herring season, they said. I have seen men chasing the first bee they saw for

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The Fairies of Cregneish

Fairies are very light and I suppose the strong winds have blown them away, as they are not allowed to come into the houses in stormy weather as they used to do, for they get no ‘Shee dy Vea’ (welcome).

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Horses Seeing Fairies

One day this winter we had no bread for tea at Orry’s Dale. On inquiring the reason the next time the baker’s cart came, the boy who drove it said that the horse saw fairies after dark, and so, as

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