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The Clergyman’s Wife

The life of a clergyman’s wife two or three hundred years ago was somewhat circumscribed. Except for the occasions when she mounted a horse behind her husband to visit friends, she did not travel outside her own parish, and her

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Ballaugh Old Parish Church

A parish church existed in Ballaugh, and presumably on the place where we now stand, at least as long ago as the year 1231, when it is mentioned in a Papal bull. It has continuously been dedicated to St. Mary,

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The Manx Church

The Manx church was the social as well as the spiritual centre of the Manx parish. At the Parish Cross, which stood outside every churchyard fence, people gathered after service to exchange news and hear the Sumner make public announcements;

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Irneit, The Celtic Bishop’s Cross-slab

The Chi-Rho is one of the earliest forms of christogram, and is used by some Christians. It is formed by superimposing the first two (capital) letters ‘chi’ and ‘rho’ (ΧΡ) of the Greek word “ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ” = Christ, in such a

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On Death in Isle of Man Folklore

• Before 1594, when it was forbidden by Statue, it was customary to carry bells and banners before the dead. • There were formerly crosses on the roads leading to the parish churches. When funerals passed, the corpse was usually

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Crossag or Monks’ Bridge

A narrow 13th century packhorse double-arched bridge paved with quartz cobbles spans the Silverburn immediately north of Rushen Abbey and adjacent to the mill race. Crossag is from ‘crosh veg’ meaning little cross. Apart from some repairs it is probably

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Purgatory Hammers

It was formerly believed in the Isle of Man that Roman Catholics were buried with a loaf of bread and a hammer. The latter was to be used in knocking at the gates of Purgatory. A Manx clergyman, who told

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Peel Island and the Shrine of St. Mochonna

Saint Conan (7th century – January, 684), also rarely known as Saint Mochonna, was a bishop of the Isle of Man and an Irish missionary. Extract from a report by PMC Kermode to the IOM Natural History & Antiquarian Society

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The Keimagh

On the Isle of Man, the Keimagh is a spirit supposed to haunt the stiles of graveyards and to guard the sacred resting places of the dead. (source: photo by John Green http://bit.ly/GzFO32; text The Manx Notebook Vol I (?1885))

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Banishing a Ghost

At a place near Peel, about sixty years ago (1850s), there was a young man came by his death, as many thought, through foul play. A certain house and people were so troubled with his ghost that they had to

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