Tag "fairy world"

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Fairies & Mortals

The airs of two or three Manx songs have the name of being ‘fairy tunes’ which were overheard in lonely places, especially on the banks of streams. Other melodies from the Middle World are ‘Tappaghyn Jiargey’ (The Red Topknots) and

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On Lhergy Roie

As I went up the Lhergy Roie, Beyond the fields of Ballasayle The mist crept round me to destroy All landmarks with its blinding veil… Then, from a world that was not mine Of sun nor moon, of noon nor

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The Manx Fairy Pig

There was once a little fairy pig that lived in the hills beyond Colby with his mother and his six brothers. His name was Shiaght, which means Seven, and his brothers were called Nane, Jees, Tree, Kiare, Quieg and Shey,

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The Nikkesen’s Pool, Lonan

The Nikkesen’s Pool, more often called simply “the Nikkesen,” is in the Awin Ruy near its junction with the Glen Roy river. It is shut in on the North side by a high, concave wall of rock over which the

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Joan Mere’s House & Well

Under the Chasms, on the shore, is a well near the sea. The salt water comes into it at high tide, but when it is ebbing the fresh water spring drives the salt water out of it, and the water

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Fairy Washers

The Fairy Washerwoman, also called the Washer of the Night, Washer at the Ford and Singer of the Night, is well established in Scotland and Ireland. She has been seen in Wales, very frequently in Western France, less often in

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Manannan Mac Lir

Miss Margaret Dobbs, an authority on Celtic mythology, delivered a lecture at the Manx Museum on 11th February, 1924, on “Manannan Mac Lir,” the ancient god of the sea, from whom, it is said, the Isle of Man is named.

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The Fairy Saddle

Manx Fairies seem to have been especially fond of the chase. If a horse were found in his stall wet with perspiration – for which no particular reason could be given – it would be said that he must have

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A Fairy Greeting

“Themselves” upon the mountains. “Themselves” that haunt the plain, That sparkle through the fountains And laugh among the rain. Greeting! Greeting! Singing in the rain, Laughing in the mountains Greet you once again. (by Josephine Kermode, from Manx Melodies (1922);

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The Phynodderee

Phynodderee/Fenodyree is sometimes used as a proper name and sometimes as the name of a class of beings, the latter of which is a hairy little creature, a sort of sprite or fairy in the folklore around the Isle of

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