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Excursion Notes to South Barrule

Excursion Notes following a Visit to South Barrule 20 August 1936: The name Barrule comes from the very ancient custom of Watch and Ward. The name is Scandinavian “Vordufjall.” Wardfell is the literary form used in the Manorial Roll; Barrool

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Crosh Molley Mooar & Poyll Vill

These two places – the former meaning the ‘great deceiving cross’ and the latter ‘the honey pool’ – are situated a little south of the stone circle on the Mull, up the way to Cregneish. The stone circle itself is

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A Wishing Spot…

Overlooking the sea…the groove of rock at Scarlett known as Cromwell’s Walk has a flat place half-way along its ledge called Cromwell’s Chair. Sit on it and wish. If you are favoured by the genius loci* your wish will come

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Mountains and Hills

The Isle of Man contains 12 peaks which stand at over 1,500 ft. All of these except for South Barrule (which is found in the south) are found in the central range which spans the region between the central valley

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Crossag or Monks’ Bridge

A narrow 13th century packhorse double-arched bridge paved with quartz cobbles spans the Silverburn immediately north of Rushen Abbey and adjacent to the mill race. Crossag is from ‘crosh veg’ meaning little cross. Apart from some repairs it is probably

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Ellan Sheeant – Sacred Isle

The Isle of Man was known to the authors of the Old Irish sagas by several names: Inis Falga, the Noble Isle; Eamhain Abhlach, the Happy Place of Apple trees (later Latinised as Eubonia); Tir Tairngire, the Land of Promise;

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The Three Wonders of Manann – The First

Nennius was a Welsh monk of the 9th century who is traditionally attributed with the authorship of the ‘Historia Brittonum’, the History of the Britons. This is a purported history of the indigenous British (Brittonic) people that was written around

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The Three Wonders of Manann – The Second

Rather unexpectedly both the second and third Wonders are associated traditionally with the parish of Onchan. Castle Rushen claims within its walls a well which rises and falls with the tide, although of fresh water – but it can scarcely

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White Quartz

In the Isle of Man, white quartz pebbles were put into Bronze Age graves and this continued up to the 17th century. If rubbed together, even under water, they give out a luminous glow, which may account for their sepulchral

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The White Lady of Glencrutchery

Glencrutchery, in the parish of Conchan on the Isle of Man, is the site of a Keeill and Burial Ground. Graves have been found and traces of cremation, showing that as in other instances, the Keeill was set on the

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