Tag "customs"

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Manslayers and Sanctuary

Until “Prowess,” or private vengeance, was made illegal by Tynwald Court held at Keeill Abban in 1429, a manslayer fleeing from the relatives of the victim often took refuge in Church or on other holy ground. But he was not

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The Water Bayliff

The Water Bayliff was not only an important figure in the Island’s maritime activities, but his office reaches very far back in our nation’s history. One of the Customary Laws of 1422 reads: “Alsoe be it ordained that the Water

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When Bees Swarm

“It’s a sign of death, mmm…yes it is. For there was three swarms came them three years, one after another, into the chimley of the house, an’ I lost three, one after the other; a big lump of a boy

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Laa’l Breeshey – St Bridget’s Feast Day

It was customary to keep this festival on the eve of the first of February, in honour of the Irish lady who came over to the Isle of Man to receive the veil from St. Maughold. The custom was to

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Laa Luanys

LAA LUANYS – LUGHNASADH – LAMMAS Is a Gaelic festival marking the beginning of the harvest season that was historically observed throughout the Isle of Man, Ireland and Scotland. Originally it was held on 31 July – 1 August, or

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The Devil’s Den

About a league and a half from Barrule, there is a hole in the earth, just at the foot of the mountain, which they call “The Devil’s Den.” They tell you that, in the days of enchantment, persons were there

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Deodand

The ancient legal penalty of Deodand, well known in England, by which an animal or object causing a death was confiscated and became the king’s property, was enforced in the Isle of Man so late as the end of the

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Manx Curse

“The stone of the church in the corner of thy house” (Clagh ny killagh ayns corneil dty hie). This is said to be the bitterest curse in the Manx language. The houses usually contained one room, a corner was partitioned

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The Dooinney Molla – The Man Praiser

This expression is applied to a friendly match-maker, introduced by the young man, to relate to the parents of the girl of his heart – in glowing terms – what a desirable match his friend would make for their daughter.

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Easter Day – Laa Chaisht

Considered an unlucky day. T. Moore who helped Dr. Clague write his book ‘Reminiscenes’ told me that his grandfather would not allow his household to go from home on Easter Day for fear of accidents.   Daffodils were not to

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